Marijuana and Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Adolescents

Abstract: Chronic nonmalignant pain in children and adolescents occurs worldwide and can be associated with a lower self-reported quality of life.1 Headache, abdominal pain, or musculoskeletal pain is the most common complaint. Comorbid symptoms such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety may exacerbate pain and contribute to notable disability, psychological distress, and impaired functioning.2 Patients may find it difficult to attend school, concentrate on homework, socialize with friends, or engage in physical activity—ie, activities at the core of being a normal adolescent (patients 13-17 years of age)—due to ongoing pain.

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